In these days, most of the ordinary people unrelated to the military think that members of Pentagon’s special forces became (unaccountable) spies. It describes what people think of when they imagine the Joint Special Operations Command, or JSOC — the secretive, ultra-elite military unit that was responsible for Operation Neptune Spear.

THE BEST OCCASION WHICH ACTUALLY CAN DESCRIBE LUDICROUS ACTS OF SUPERHUMAN BRAVADO IS RELATED TO THE K-BAR, JSOC’S UNIT COMMANDER IN IRAQ AT THE TIME. DURING OPERATION, K-BAR GETS SHOT IN THE CHEST BY INSURGENTS. HE WAVES AWAY HIS MEDIC UNTIL HE FINISHES KILLING HIS ASSAILANTS. HIS REWARD? LEADING JSOC’S OPERATIONS IN AFGHANISTAN.

Such stories are part of JSOC’s myth and mystique which ultimately built invisible walls around JSOC and even now, that mystique is hard to penetrate. JSOC is considered so secretive that it instructs its members not to write down important information, lest it is vulnerable to disclosure under the Freedom of Information Act according to the book which reveals that killing might not even be the most important thing JSOC does.

Marc Ambinder wrote a book about JSOC and he go deep inside to reveal that it has become perhaps the government’s most effective intelligence agency. Ambinder is a former reporter for The Atlantic and National Journal. He claims that unassuming office buildings around the Washington area and beyond have become unlabeled spy centers that process untold volumes of information extracted from JSOC’s hunting operations, with such a rapid analytic turnaround time that the operators of the unit can quickly begin planning their next mission. In fact, he reports in The Command, his eBook, the integration of tactical spying within JSOC is so thorough that it’s hard to distinguish real-time operators from analysts.

Yet Joint Special Operations Command operates with practically no accountability. In Iraq they were accused of running a torture chamber at a place called Camp Nama — until its leader, Stanley McChrystal and his intelligence chief, Michael Flynn, cleaned it up.

Navy SEALs Team Six
Reportedly members of US Navy SEALs Team Six at undisclosed location
The JSOC is supposed to answer to the chain of command, but it advised President Obama not to ask which Navy SEAL operator actually killed Osama bin Laden — and then wouldn’t tell Barrack Obama’s chief of staff, who ignored the advice. Even while the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) works intimately with JSOC, it whispers to reporters, self-interestedly, that the JSOC is out of control.

But JSOC has the biggest trump card of all to play, institutionally: it works. Killing Osama bin Laden was just the culmination of a furious, decade-long pace of lethal operations, involving hundreds of Afghanistan night raids in a single year; what Ambinder describes as a “free hand” in Somalia, including dramatic hostage rescue operation up there; and unseen counterterrorism mission from Pakistan to, of all places, Peru. JSOC is so busy its leadership thinks it’s exhausted, and prominent analysts claim it needs to step up its game to prevent nuclear terrorism.

But however, so far, JSOC was and still is one of the main mechanism to defend American cause and our freedom.

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